feeding wood

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feeding wood

Post by Betty Bedford on Sun Sep 15, 2013 9:03 am

Hello i was wondering if anyone has treated dry wood (not sure thats the best explanation of it) inside there camper.  i have tryed some lemon oil on a small bit and it came up beautiful but as it is very expensive and will take a couple of goes i think i was wondering if anyone had used anything else.  I was going to try beeswax?
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Re: feeding wood

Post by Paulmold on Sun Sep 15, 2013 9:17 am

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Re: feeding wood

Post by Betty Bedford on Sun Sep 15, 2013 9:24 am

Thanks very much for that I will be giving that a go when the weather clears up a bit i think lol :)
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Re: feeding wood

Post by Dutto on Sun Sep 15, 2013 10:35 am

Hi there,

I still prefer oil to varnish.wave 

MAKE SURE THAT WHAT YOU ARE GOING TO OIL IS WOOD AND NOT PLASTIC OR A VERY THIN WOOD VENEER!! look here look here 

Preparation is easy:

1.  GENTLY sand the wood down to a smooth finish with the finest grade of sandpaper that you can find.

2.  Wipe the surface free from dust with a damp "lint free" towel and allow the wood to dry.

3.  Take a bit of old bath towel and scrunch it up inside a a square of old "lint free" cloth to make up a pad about the size of half a tennis ball.

4.  Pour a bit of oil out into a cereal bowl and dip the pad into the oil. (Note 1)

5.  When the oil has soaked into the pad gently rub the pad across and then along the grain of the wood to get a consistent colour. (Note 2)

6.  Let the oil soak into the wood and dry.

The oil should dry to a "satin" finish.  If it doesn't then repeat Steps 5 & 6 up to three times.

Note 1.  Some oils may require thinning with white spirits or turpentine to get them to soak into the wood; so check the instructions on the tin.

Note 2.  DO NOT try and do it in one go and DO NOT slop a load of oil onto the wood and then smear it about.  In both cases the oil will dry on the surface to a dull soft finish that will easily "scuff"

I think the smell that comes off linseed oil has to be one of natures finest aromas.  Enjoy.allthumbz allthumbz 

Hope this helps.

Best regards,
drinksallround

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Re: feeding wood

Post by Betty Bedford on Sun Sep 15, 2013 11:46 am

Thanks Dutto hadn't really thought of useing linseed oil, i might try that as it's going to need something to really soak into it.
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Re: feeding wood

Post by modelman on Sun Sep 15, 2013 1:23 pm

Yeh, be careful, like Dutto says, I thought it was all wood on my talisman, but it aint!!

The edge/corners ARE wood profiles, but all the panels are a pressed-on vinyl wood effect sheeting.

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Re: feeding wood

Post by Betty Bedford on Fri Sep 20, 2013 8:19 pm

hugegrins spent the afternoon linseed oiling the wood and it has come up BEAUTIFUL! thanks for the advice it now has a lovely tone to the wood and looks great with the bunting lol!


Last edited by Betty Bedford on Fri Sep 20, 2013 8:19 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : spelling mistake)
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Re: feeding wood

Post by Dutto on Sat Sep 21, 2013 12:39 am

Hi there,

Glad you are happy with the result and I just love the smell of Linseed Oil. allthumbz 

Enjoy. wave 

Best regards,
drinksallround

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Re: feeding wood

Post by SherpaSam on Wed Sep 17, 2014 1:04 am

Just a warning to anyone else thinking of doing this: Be careful with disposal of Linseed oil soaked rags as they can spontaneously combust due to the fast and exothermic oxidation reaction of the Linseed.

Also if, as is suggested, you thin your linseed with turpentine to make it soak in (which is very good for the wood) make sure you use genuine Turpentine not white spirit, But use gloves, avoid splashes on the skin and work in a well ventilated area, making sure there is plenty of time for the fumes to disperse before using the Van. I wouldn't sleep in there for a week.
But it is really good for the wood.
A coating of a good Beeswax polish will help seal in all that goodness.

Linseed oil is entirely non toxic and is also sold (labelled Flax Oil ) as a health food.
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Re: feeding wood

Post by petern on Wed Sep 17, 2014 11:58 am

Last year, we used linseed oil on the wood trims round the cupboards on our Rapport as the colours were fading and blotched, and they came up beautifully.

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Re: feeding wood

Post by Jaytee on Wed Sep 17, 2014 12:26 pm

A question for all you knowledgable folk: do you use boiled linseed or natural and what's the difference?

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Re: feeding wood

Post by SherpaSam on Wed Sep 17, 2014 1:21 pm

Hi Jaytee,

The main difference is drying speed. What is sold as "Boiled" Linseed oil is often not boiled but has additives to make it dry faster. I think "heat treated" is the modern term for boiled linseed oil without additives.

Either way, "Natural" linseed oil takes longer to fully dry, particularly in cold or damp conditions, or if applied too thickly: Always put linseed oil on in multiple very thin coats (which is where thinning with Turpentine helps) leaving to dry in between.
If your van spends time laid up, then pop in every couple of weeks to apply a very thinned down coat, remembering to leave two or three weeks for drying and fume clearance (if thinning with Turpentine) before sleeping in it.

Or just wipe one coat of Boiled over the surfaces to spruce it up and leave a few days to dry fully. No Fume problem, but just a surface treatment.

After a few weeks to fully dry out, use beeswax furniture polish to finish.
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Re: feeding wood

Post by Nain on Wed Sep 17, 2014 6:37 pm

Following advice after doing a search on this forum I tried Danish oil applied with a bit of very fine wire wool, allowed to dry for a few days then buffed up. All wooden trims came up a treat. Danish oil was less than £4 for a tin from Wilkinsons - hardly used any to get a good finish.  allthumbz
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Re: feeding wood

Post by Bertie Bedford on Fri May 29, 2015 5:22 pm

Hello!

I have been having a read through these posts as we are wanting to smarten up our scuffed and scratched cupboards in our 1975 Bedford CF250 Autosleeper.

I believe they have a thin wood veneer layer, as I can see on one drawer that the veneer is starting to lift a little... I think they have also had a varnish applied at some point which we would like to 'dull' down so that it matched the original wood inside the van.

Would the only way to do this be to gently sand and then apply a danish oil? We wouldn't want to stain/darken them, just bring out the colour...we are a little worried if we sand too much or apply the wrong product this would damage them!

Has anyone successfully restored their veneer?

Appreciate any suggestions - thank you in advance!

Lisa
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Re: feeding wood

Post by Sue68 on Fri May 29, 2015 10:07 pm

I have laminated wood doors in our house and have been told not to oil them but use an oil based varnish

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Re: feeding wood

Post by Dutto on Fri May 29, 2015 10:57 pm

Hi there,

As a young lad I did a lot of marquetry which is where you glue a load of wood veneers to a baseboard to make up a picture; and the final jobs are sanding and polishing.

Starting with a 1mm veneer doesn't leave much room for error but if a veneer isn't actually "gouged" then imperfections such as scratches can be removed with very light sanding using a very, very fine sand paper.

The problem with todays materials is that many "wood" veneers are actually compressed paper with a wood-grain pattern printed on top.  If you start sanding one of these veneers the "grain" will rapidly disappear and you will come to a dirty grey colour at which point you go "Oops!"  A good way to establish if your veneer is "printed" is to look closely to see if the grain is perfectly repeated.  If it repeats like a wallpaper pattern it is a "printed" veneer.

Varnish is another problem.  It discolours, lifts to allow water underneath it and will eventually peel; which is why I prefer oiling wood.

The very best way to remove varnish is by scraping it off; and the very best scraper is the edge of a broken piece of the glass used to manufacture the old-style coke bottles.  (Dangerous to make, dangerous to use but great in the hands of someone who knows what they are doing!)

The next best method is by using a paint stripper such as Nirtromors with a triangular scraper; but, unfortunately, NOT on veneers because there is a chance that the paint stripper will get behind the veneer and start loosening the adhesive.

Finally, we are down to sanding the varnish off with a very fine sandpaper.  My best tip to make sure that the varnish is removed evenly by wrapping the sandpaper around a smooth block of wood or a commercially bought sanding block.  That way you won't be overenthusiastic in one spot and sand a channel into the veneer.

So, assuming that ....

.... you have a wood veneer and ....

.... you manage to remove the varnish and sand out the imperfections without going through to the base, then ....

.... I recommend a light oiling as described above.

Hope this helps. allthumbz

Best regards,
drinksallround

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Re: feeding wood

Post by Bertie Bedford on Mon Jun 08, 2015 10:37 am

Thank you for the tips guys! We haven't had a chance to get and and try, as soon as we do I will post and update and some pics!  smile!

Lisa
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Re: feeding wood

Post by logburner on Mon Nov 16, 2015 5:39 pm

Betty Bedford wrote:Hello i was wondering if anyone has treated dry wood (not sure thats the best explanation of it) inside there camper.  i have tryed some lemon oil on a small bit and it came up beautiful but as it is very expensive and will take a couple of goes i think i was wondering if anyone had used anything else.  I was going to try beeswax?

Hi,
I expect its too late for you... shrugg ....but I have recently used a spray polish on my hardwood edging strips, and anything else that looks a bit dull or watermarked, with great success.....Its called "Wood Silk". It says, the original non silicone wood silk, with beeswax.
Its made by Aristowax Products of Norwich. Its in a yellow aerosol can with a plastic lid that looks like a beehive. Its not sticky.   up!
Got mine from Home Bargains, but I believe its also sold at Tesco.
                                                Best of luck...............Ian.
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Dry wood.

Post by steverussell on Fri Jul 08, 2016 10:31 am

I find Danish oil is a great restorative for all old wood. It brings out the grain really well and once its soaked in provides a tough finish. A couple of coats should do it.
Steve.
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Re: feeding wood

Post by hdv on Sat Jul 09, 2016 7:35 am

I use Wood Silk after every trip out when I clean up. Smells lovely and the wood loves it too!
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Re: feeding wood

Post by Cymro on Sat Jul 09, 2016 8:58 am

Is there any real wood in my 2015 Nuevo? I thought it was all artificial laminate finish.

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Re: feeding wood

Post by Campievanner on Tue Aug 16, 2016 8:49 pm

I love wood silk. It has taken several times of polishing my neglected (not by me)  Frisky & it is looking better all the time.
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Re: feeding wood

Post by logburner on Tue Aug 16, 2016 10:03 pm

Campievanner wrote:I love wood silk. It has taken several times of polishing my neglected (not by me)  Frisky & it is looking better all the time.
Glad you like it........make a awkward job easy.      allthumbz
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Re: feeding wood

Post by biffobear on Mon Apr 10, 2017 7:19 am

I renovated the light oak door, draw and work top edging profiles on my A/S last year. This style of cabinet was used from the late eighties well into the two thousands with a change of door handle style around 1992/3 to the push button type.  Something had been splashed on them from the sink I guess. First it's easier to remove doors and draws. Work top's cabinet edging is done in place. Firstly mask up all the surounding printed "wood" panels. Then use Nitromores varnish remover with wire wool. A stainless steel pan scourer I found to be very good without causing any damage. Might be an ideal to mask or remove push button "brass" door handles. Once the varnish is removed clean the edging up with white spirit on a rag. Once dry and to keep the original Auto Sleeper look, use Ronseal clear satin. Do not use any varnish with wood stain added as the will only make the wood a darker shade and IMO looks awful. 3 coats brushed on and dryed in the sun should do it. Wait until totally dry before removing masking tape. Mine look like they have just come out of the factory and don't look like a renovation job at all which is what I was aiming for. Hope that helps.
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