trolly jack

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trolly jack

Post by suzieh on Thu Apr 07, 2016 4:25 pm

Afternoon folks, We dont have a jack for our legend was wondering which would be the best to use if we need to change wheel thanks in antisipation
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Re: trolly jack

Post by boxerman on Thu Apr 07, 2016 4:38 pm

I reckon that the best tool I ever bought was my first trolley jack! However, they are a bit big and clunky to carry around in a motorhome. I'd have a shop around for a decent bottle jack if I was you. Make sure that it is capable of lifting your van and that it can lift high enough to get a wheel clear of the ground.

Frank
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Re: trolly jack

Post by -mojo- on Thu Apr 07, 2016 4:49 pm

The most obvious thing to watch for is the weight rating - although it's typically lifting only one corner or side of the van, I've never felt that comfortable unless the jack is rated at two thirds of the van's MTPLM - which typically on a van of that type is a minimum of 2-2.5 Tonnes.

The next thing to be aware of is that you should ~never~ work under a vehicle supported only by a hydraulic jack - so you should really have at least one fixed axle stand available unless you are not going under. For wheel changes that should not be necessary, ~provided~ you don't do what a lot of people do - which is to work with their legs under the van!

The next constraint is size. Even the smallest of trolley jacks is large and heavy, and once you get above 2 Tonnes they can get very big indeed. This is the main reason I don't carry a trolley jack in my current van - I simply don't have the space to store one. Having said that, the factory jack for a Ford Transit is big and heavy anyway, which probably explains why a lot of owners take theirs out and leave them in the garage...

A hydraulic bottle jack can be a good compromise, but you have to check the lowest and highest heights on them, as single-stage ones can have a very limited lifting range (and true 2-stage ones are very very expensive). Don't forget that you need to be able to get it under when the tyre is flat.
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Re: trolly jack

Post by rogerblack on Thu Apr 07, 2016 5:01 pm

Having had some near disasters in the past attempting to change wheels myself by the side of the road, I long ago decided that it was a job best left to the guys* with the high vis kit, big vehicles with lots of flashing lights and the proper equipment and experience, employed by whichever breakdown company I subscribe to on the particular vehicle I am driving.

cheers
Roger

* I haven't so far seen any gals doing the job but have no doubt there will be some.
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Re: trolly jack

Post by Charliefarlie on Thu Apr 07, 2016 5:03 pm

Have a look at the two below. I bought both from Costco. The red one is rated at two tons and is way more than you need to lift your vehicle. It is built mainly of aluminium and is really very strong indeed. Big enough while light and ultra stable ! The brand Is "Arcan" Costo also sell Arcan adjustable axle stands which again are excellent quality and super strong !

The jack is on offer right now at about 70 to 80 quid. The axle stands are usually in stock at about £40. 


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Re: trolly jack

Post by chrisvesey on Thu Apr 07, 2016 5:09 pm

Hi,
The best bottle jack I have is the one originally supplied with the iveco vans, two stage plus the screw out section, we supplied loads of vans converted to access vehicles and every fitter aquired one of these jacks, might be worth ebay search,
Chris

Just checked ebay, one for £40
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Re: trolly jack

Post by boxerman on Thu Apr 07, 2016 5:11 pm

My 2 tonne trolley jack was struggling to lift my van which is why I bought the 3.5 tonne one. Might be OK on a flat smooth floor but not so good at the side of the road [been there - done that!]

Frank
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Re: trolly jack

Post by chrisvesey on Thu Apr 07, 2016 5:38 pm

I had trouble lifting the front of the van to get both wheels off the ground (don't ask) but for a simple corner lift for a puncture it was ok, getting the spare out past the towbar was another matter, especially ifits a back wheel flat and the van is 4 inches lower, happy days, calling international rescue,
Chris
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Re: trolly jack

Post by artheytrate on Thu Apr 07, 2016 7:20 pm

I carry a 6 ton bottle jack which came with it's own plastic case and it fits inside the wet locker of our van.

John.
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Re: trolly jack

Post by Charliefarlie on Thu Apr 07, 2016 7:27 pm

I thought the OP said trolley jack ?

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Re: trolly jack

Post by meanchris on Thu Apr 07, 2016 8:06 pm

A trick that I've occasionally had to employ is to drive a vehicle over a suitable object to raise it enough to get a jack underneath.

I've even used the car spare wheel once, though I wouldn't do that with the van front wheels.

A brick, or one of your yellow ramps might do the trick in an emergency if you can't get the jack under because of the terrain or because it's an inch or two too tall.
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Re: trolly jack

Post by terrybrinklow on Fri Apr 08, 2016 3:36 pm

Got to admit I too use the Rescue services .Got spoilt by driving "mini buses" for the company I worked for,in fact the mini buses 10 years ago stopped having jacks and wheel braces supplied.You just call the rescue service as someone on call 24/7.In my time I have used RAC, AA, County Council ,and now Mayday, courtesy of the Caravan Club.
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Re: trolly jack

Post by NORGIL on Fri Apr 08, 2016 4:05 pm

Let the expert roadside assistance guys do it.  Changing the wheel /tyre of a motorhome bears no comparison with doing the same on a car. The weight of the spare wheel/tyre and the fact that mine is located some distance away from the rear of the vehicle which  involves crawling under the van makes it an almost certainty for a strained back/pulled muscle if not worse just to get it down not to mention trying to put the deflated one back.

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Re: trolly jack

Post by meanchris on Fri Apr 08, 2016 4:55 pm

I drove our previous van home from the seller 25 miles away, with no problem.

However, the next day, when SWMBO and I drove it about 10 miles to my brother's house in the middle of nowhere, we got to within a mile and I noticed that the steering felt very heavy at low speed.
The offside front tyre was flat and beyond safe to use again.
Luckily my brother's wife brought us some tools in their truck, as the jack and wheelbrace with the van were seized solid and the wrong size respectively.

Even then it was an hour's work to jack the monster up and remove the 20 year old wheel studs.

The spare turned out to be flat, but luckily we were able to pump it up and get moving again, all this in a fairly safe and secluded location off the beaten track.

Heaven help us if this had happened on a normal 60mph limit road.

We now have an external side locker on the new van, and carry a trolley jack along with extending wheelbrace and the correct size socket, as well as a 12V tyre pump.
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